Want Repeat Business? Protect the Customer’s Data

Want Repeat Business? Protect the Customer’s Data

Ask most CEOs how they get new customers, and “referrals” will be in the top three. How do you get referrals? Earn the trust of your customers, and they will tell their friends about you. On the other hand, if you lose that trust, customers will not only leave, but they’ll also tell their friends why.

7 Ways to Shop Safe on Black Friday and Cyber Monday

7 Ways to Shop Safe on Black Friday and Cyber Monday

Black Friday and Cyber Monday are expected to be a shopper’s paradise with the biggest discounts of the year available from almost every retail store, in-store and online. With more than 4 billion internet users worldwide, it is also a hacker’s dream to target the expected two biggest online shopping days of 2018.

Malicious cybercriminals live for the opportunity to take advantage of the influx of purchasing and steal credit card data or private information.

How to Know When Your Data Enters the Dark Web

How to Know When Your Data Enters the Dark Web

The breach of as many as 90 million Facebook accounts is bad news for the social media company, but it’s even worse news for the users whose sensitive personal data was compromised. That’s because hackers won’t make their money by posting an embarrassing status update or “liking” Nickelback on your profile.

Featured on Due – 4 Strategies to Avoid Costly Credential Stuffing

Featured on Due – 4 Strategies to Avoid Costly Credential Stuffing

Cybersecurity threats are becoming more prevalent each year, and business owners need to focus on protecting their companies and upgrading their defenses. Companies that use the internet to do business are especially at risk for credential stuffing, a tactic wherein botnets attempt to use fraudulent login data to access information.

How To Spot Phishing Attempts Before You’re On The Hook – Thinking Bigger

How To Spot Phishing Attempts Before You’re On The Hook – Thinking Bigger

As seen in Thinking Bigger Business Media edition and written by Jon Schram.

In the security world, it seems like every day brings another story of customer data being compromised. One of the latest examples comes from Children’s Mercy Hospital, where patients are still finding their data endangered after an email phishing scam hit more than 60,000 individuals back in January.

The Purple Guys featured in Forbes Magazine for Cybersecurity

The Purple Guys featured in Forbes Magazine for Cybersecurity

Every Piece of Data is Valuable to Hackers
Almost every attack at banking and financial institutions is aimed at financial gain. Some are direct, such as the ATM and account hacks noted earlier, but others are more indirect. For instance, the PT report showed that malware attacks increased by 75 percent during the last year, collecting information such as account logins, answers to security questions, Social Security numbers, and more.

Cryptojacking Malware: What It Is and How to Fix It

Cryptojacking Malware: What It Is and How to Fix It

(As featured on ReadWrite)

Cryptojacking is a cyberattack like no other. Attackers don’t steal your data or ransom off access to your network. Instead, they commandeer your hardware when you’re not looking and redline the processors to mine cryptocurrency.

How to Protect Your Network and Devices From Cryptojacking

How to Protect Your Network and Devices From Cryptojacking

If you don’t know that your computer or server is being cryptojacked, how will you find the malware and remove it?

Unlike other forms of malware, cryptojacking doesn’t seek to disrupt your business — at least not immediately. On the contrary, its goal is to steal your processing power so that hackers can mine cryptocurrency, which the malware can accomplish only by remaining hidden as long as possible.

What Businesses Need to Know Now About Cryptojacking

What Businesses Need to Know Now About Cryptojacking

What happens when hackers steal your processing power but not your data?

IBM Managed Security Services reported in 2017 that the number of CPUs hijacked just to mine cryptocurrency grew sixfold between January and August. These computers are infected with highly intelligent viruses that steal their processing power, and they’re smart enough to avoid detection.